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Common Roof Types by Region

Common Roof TypesWe all know how important the roof is to our home. It is the cornerstone of safety and protection, making our home a practical shelter from outdoor temperatures, weather, and more. It also serves the double duty of being a beautiful topper to the appearance of a home. For this reason, a good roof is important to every home. Atlanta and Marietta roofers know that our area needs certain roofing based on not only local home design trends, but also the geographical details of our region in the country. To compare where we live to the other geographical regions of the country, here is a list and descriptor of the different types of roofs that are common throughout America.

NORTHEAST
Northeasterners are used to rainfall, but mostly have to endure snowfall, as Northeastern winters are extremely cold. Asphalt roofs are used in these homes to insulate against the dangerously cold weather and are also durable and flexible enough to support the weight of snow collected on a roof. Architectural styles that resemble the early English settlements in this oldest region of the country rely on asphalt for a more durable version of the wooden-shingle roofs that were common on early pilgrim houses, while still looking quite a bit like thin wooden shingles. Midwestern states also adopt this roofing type because of the frequency of snowfall.

NORTHWEST
In the Northwest region, rainfall, cloudy skies, hazy weather, and abundant fog define the region, along with beautiful forests and rich greenery. Because of this wet weather, asphalt roofs are common to this region. They are often weather treated with a special coating to prevent the frequent rains from eroding the asphalt tiles. Other Northwesterners may prefer a sealed metal roof, as it not only resists water damage but actually is slick enough to allow moisture to slip off and into the yard, ensuring that water does not collect on top of a home.

SOUTHWEST
Southwestern states are used to plenty of sunshine and hot weather, with little need for rain protection. Homes in this region often use clay tiles, a detail that defines the aesthetic of the Southwestern home, along with stucco walls and decorative cacti, resembling the early Spanish missions that were founded in this region. Clay tiles reflect the strong sunlight and heat, naturally insulating a home from scorching temperatures. Another similar style of southwestern home reflects the history of adobe Native American homes and other local natives who created an architectural style that remains influential today. These homes look similar to the above-described Southwestern style, but with flat roofs and even domes. Flat roofs are common as there is little need to prevent against water collection.

SOUTHEAST
Southeasterners like us in the Atlanta/Marietta region know that we are lucky to have a slower, warm, easy lifestyle compared to the hustle and bustle and extreme weather of other regions. Because of the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean, though, we must be on guard against potential tropical storms and hurricanes, which target our region first. While asphalt is a common roofing type everywhere because it is inexpensive, many new homes here have adopted the use of metal roofing. Roofers like us know that this material of roof is versatile enough to suit either ranch homes or the traditional Georgian, Victorian and Regency homes that define the Southeast. Metal roofs are also durable enough to resist moisture and high humidity, protecting homes from water damage should that hurricane make its way to us.

Professional roofers are available to help you repair your roof or install a new one, and can consult with you about the ideal roof to suit not only the architectural style of your home but the climate issues your roof will need to endure as well.